Creekside Ambiance - each room
has a private deck by the stream

 

"We're not leaving
until you stop feeding us."
--Lexington, KY

 


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or right here!


 


Awarded
BEST BREAKFAST
IN AMERICA
by the
Bed & Breakfast Journal

 

 

This has to be one of our
all-time favorite awards.
It dates back to when
Arrington's Bed & Breakfast
Journal had their very first
Book of Lists awards, and all
the winners were chosen from
votes by Guests! 


It was quite an honor
and very exciting when the
big box tied with a red ribbon
arrived, with our certificate.

 

 

Now, we're sure that there are
eleventy-bazillion places that
could easily vie for best food
in America - but it was sure
fun getting these awards!
And we'll do our best to see
that you're pleased with
breakfast, too.

 

 

 

 

 

Our coffee is
Elida Estate
from Panama.
 

This award-winner is
roasted and shipped to us
from the Lamastas family.
 

Then it's brewed here
with our own
mountain spring water.
 

You won't find a better
cup of coffee
anywhere.

 

 

If you enjoy it as much as we do,
order from
www.geishacoffee.com

 

(No, we don't make commissions.
We just like to spread the word
when we find something special.)

 

 

Your Innkeepers:
Larry & Sandee Wright
chef@timberwolfcreek.com 
Toll-free (888) 525-4218
or Locally (828) 926-2608
Maggie Valley, North Carolina

 

 

 

 

PROPERTY

The two king suites are in the main
building, named The Creek House.
The two queen rooms are in the guest
house, named The Black Bear Cottage in
the Woods.
Click either to see a floor plan.

Or HERE if you'd prefer to rent one of
the houses as a stand-alone vacation rental.

 

POLICIES

 



On The Menu

A guest said to me, "The only thing missing on your website is a way to convey these excellent breakfasts."  Thank you, Wilfred, for the very kind words, and I'll try to do better!  here goes...

 

Breakfast at Timberwolf Creek

Creative, Delicious, and Plentiful

 

for the main course: 
Caprese Eggs, Pepperjack Grits Cakes, Bacon, Orange, Kiwi and Avocado

 

 

Epicurious magazine asked us what we're making for breakfast, on Facebook:


    Typically, we serve a sweet breakfast one morning, and a savory the next. 
If you have a preference, please let us know.  We're happy to oblige. 

   

Whenever possible, we use fresh, local, organic eggs and produce. 
Our eggs are free-range and organic-fed from a local farmer. 
Jams, apple butter and sauces are made in our kitchen or from the farmer's market. 
Apples, berries, and tomatoes are from my Uncle Carroll's place,
the historic Crockett-Campbell Homestead at the foot of the hill. 

 

    Here are a couple of examples of typical morning fare...

 

Savory...

 

FRESH PINEAPPLE SPEARS
and Just-Whipped Cream
 

EGGS NICHOLAS
Ham cups filled with
either
portabella mushrooms in cream
or
spinach parmesan
and then
topped with an egg,
drizzled with heavy cream,
and baked until the egg is set
 

SWEET HASH
A combination of diced
white potatoes
and sweet potatoes
sauteed in olive oil,
with just
a touch of rosemary


BUTTERMILK BISCUITS
with honey butter and jam
 

Your choice of Juice
Elida Estate Coffee

Sweet...

 

FRIED APPLES
Apples are local and abundant. 
We usually have two types
in our friend apples.  They are
steamed, then seared in butter
with cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg
and ginger, then carmelized
with brown sugar.  There is rarely
any evidence left on a plate
that these were ever served.  :)


CHAPELURE
Now, chapelure is just French for
breadcrumbs, so if you are offered
chapelure anywhere else, be
suspicious!  This isn't really the
ubiquitous Oven French Toast which
has become standard B&B fare. 
It's filled with berries and nuts
and granola and spices and
all sorts of good things.
Served with Just-Whipped Cream
and Maple Syrup


SAGE SAUSAGE or BACON


Your choice of Juice
Elida Estate Coffee

 

 

This is a Blueberry-Ricotta Chapelure...
I was looking for a better description than 'oven French toast' or 'bread pudding'
and neither seemed to suit.  It's my own recipe, and includes French bread, sourdough, and a croissant for tenderness - then a blend of eggs and whole milk and a bit of cream and brown sugar and Mexican vanilla and spices (always nutmeg, usually mace, clove and ginger - sometimes cinnamon, it depends on the fruit).  I searched high and low for inspiration and finally said, "Oh for heaven's sake, it's just bread crumbs...  Ok, French bread crumbs."  So, I looked up the translation and voila' - Chapelure!

 

Blueberry Ricotta Chapelure

   

 

You'll be asked, when you make your reservation, if you have any dietary issues or special needs that we should know about.  And we'll tell you, "I don't like onions is just as important as I'm allergic to strawberries."  We want you to really enjoy your breakfast, so tell us what your favorites are, tell us what you'd rather not be served.  Not to worry, though: you'll be served a hearty breakfast with enough variety to find something that pleases you.

 

 

Buttermilk Belgian Waffles, Scrambled Eggs, and Bacon (of course)

 

 

 

Click on the little thumbnail pictures for a larger view

Orange Creme
Stuffed French Toast

A loaf of French bread, sliced and filled with a sweet orange-vanilla cream, dunked in French toast batter and grilled... It will remind you of a dreamsicle!    Easy to see why this is a much-requested guest favorite!

 

Eggs Nicholas
Shaved ham cups with a spinach-parmesan filling, topped with a farm fresh egg and heavy cream, baked to perfection.

Grilled Peach Puffs
Start with peach halves in a sugar glaze, grill until toasty brown, and then put them in flaky golden puff pastry with some just-whipped cream, drizzle on a bit of vanilla sauce and you've got one heavenly fruit course.


    It's our goal to make certain that you have a satisfying meal - enough that you'll most likely want to skip lunch!  If you're having breakfast delivered to your room, you'll enjoy the same menu and variety as those being served at table.  Here are a few recent examples...

 

 

blueberry scones

 

    And we're happy to share our recipes.  We did publish a cookbook, if you'd like a keepsake of your stay, with 27 innkeepers across the country.  Some time ago, we founded CAIK (Caucus of American InnKeepers) and a few of us came together to create the cookbook, "A Piece of CAIK" for you.  Each innkeeper provided recipes for their favorite breakfast foods, and a cake, of course, as well as hints and anecdotes.  It's fun.  But if you're looking for a recipe for something you had at breakfast here, don't hesitate to ask. 

 

    Of course, some of the things we make have developed over time, and haven't ever been written down!  You might be the first to actually put it to paper.  :)

 

Buttermilk Pancakes - light as air and lots tastier

 

The whole entire secret to making good pancakes -really excellent pancakes- is eggs.  You can use a recipe, you can use a mix.  But if you use a mix, you have to ignore the part where it doesn't call for eggs.  Separate a couple of eggs, and beat the egg whites - you want them pretty stiff, like a meringue.  I sprinkle in a bit of sugar toward the end because I'm impatient and it makes them peak faster.  ('Peak' as in, when you lift the beater out of the egg whites, it leaves a nice peak.)  Now, set these aside and mix up your regular pancake batter, and fold in that meringue.  I've used lots of recipes, but none of them make better tasting pancakes than Krusteaz buttermilk pancake mix.  Now, I do add Mexican vanilla and the eggs to that mix.  If you're a purist who wants a recipe, here's mine:  2 eggs, 3 C flour, 2 T baking powder,  1 t baking soda, 1 tsp salt, 2 T sugar, 1 T brown sugar, 2 C buttermilk, 1 T Mexican vanilla, plus whole milk as necessary.  Whip egg whites, adding 1 T sugar to help them hold their peaks.  Set aside.  Mix everything else, including egg yolks.  Add milk in small amounts until you have the consistency of very heavy paint.  And then fold in the egg whites.  They don't need to be blended in completely.  Cook on a preheated 350 griddle. 

The reason for the first tablespoon of sugar is the make the meringue.  The second is to sweeten the batter.  The brown sugar adds depth.  The meringue makes the pancakes say, "Poof!" when they hit the griddle, and puffs them up light as air, while the sugars combine to make them brown so prettily.

The reason for the Mexican vanilla is two-fold.  First, it's really good vanilla.  The second is that, when I'm out of vanilla, Larry has to take me back to Mexico.  If you are tempted, now, to tell Larry where I can find Mexican vanilla closer to home, I'm going to have to do something about you.  So... don't...  Ok?

If you just really don't like to cook, that's ok.  I've got this one.  Come on down, and I'll make you up a mess o' pancakes.

 


Here's the recipe for Sandee's Peach-Apple Crisp

 

6 Apples or 8 Peaches or any combination (peeled, pitted, cored, sliced)

2/3 Cup light brown sugar 2/3 Cup graham crumbs 2/3 Cup self-rising flour 1 stick of butter, melted (1/2 cup) *Not margarine! 1 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp nutmeg 1/4 tsp each ground cloves and ginger

Optional: 1/2 cup chopped nuts, or raisins, or dried cranberries, or fresh blueberries Grease and flour pan (or pans). Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

If you're using fresh apples, put them in a microwavable dish and toss with 1/2 cup of water and 2 tablespoons of orange juice. Cover (with a plate, or plastic wrap) and microwave for 3 minutes. If your peaches are a bit hard, do this step with them. Drain completely.

Toss fruit in 1/4 cup of the flour. Evenly distribute in pan (or pans). Tuck in any optional items.

Stir together all the dry ingredients until well blended, pour in melted butter and mix (preferably by hand) until completely incorporated. Mixture will be mealy. That's good.

Spread topping evenly over fruit, pat down, and bake 30 minutes or until the top is bubbly and crisp.

 

 Notes:

  • You can really use any kind of fresh or frozen fruit, canned fruit, or pie filling and this works well. We just really like the combination of apples and peaches.

  • Canned fruit and pie filling don't need to be dredged in flour.

  • Let frozen fruit thaw and drain first.

  • I make up the mixture of sugar/graham/flour/spices and keep it in a Tupperware bowl. Then when I'm ready to make the crisp, I prep the fruit, melt some butter and mix up just enough to top whatever size dishes I'm using.

  • Having your fruit partially prepared just means it gets heated through while the topping cooks. VERY easy dish if you are using ready-to-go fruit.

 

 making the apple-butter